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A Third Exhibit, NICAP Commission

http://www.thelateshows.org.uk/home.html

In March 2015 I was part of a collaborative commission for NICAP alongside Helen Shaddock, Ed Wainwright, Corbin Wood, Jack Lines and Mags Margetts to produce a piece of work responding to Newcastle University’s Hatton Gallery collection of Victor Pasmore’s work, in particular focusing on his seminal spatial work ‘An Exhibit’.

http://moussemagazine.it/taac1-b/

This group commission produced an interactive audiovisual response to Pasmore’s work, informed by the disciplines of each person involved, including music, digital interactivity, architecture, visual art, creative coding and fabrication.

‘An Exhibit’ comprised a number of coloured plexiglass sheets hung in the Hatton Gallery which would create the visual effect of coloured windows through which would filter the vision of observers, much like a filter on a photograph. As there were a number of these plexiglass sheets, by moving around the gallery space visitors could experiment with the effects of their physical placement on their ability to observe the world through these filters. Despite the fact that this work was produced in 1957, it had a strong focus on interactivity, and this was the driving force for our response, ‘A Third Exhibit’.

‘A Third Exhibit’ took inspiration from these plexiglass sheets with weighted cloth sheets suspended in the air of the main Hatton Gallery space using helium balloons which would freely move around the space according to air turbulence created by foot traffic throughout the exhibition. These weighted cloth sheets were then lit by eight DMX lights, controlled from my laptop by two distance-sensing ‘nodes’ placed at central points of the gallery space to be triggered by the actions of visitors. There was also a musical piece composed by Corbin Wood using sound recordings taken throughout the collaborative process which was triggered by the activation of these nodes.

My responsibility for the work was in designing the interactive system which would turn the movement of visitors into changes in lighting through the space. The distance-sensing ‘nodes’ I used to do this took the form of camera tripods with Arduino Mega boards mounted on them, with each Mega board being host to a ring of eight HC-SR04 ultrasonic distance sensors. The information generated by these nodes was fed back to a laptop over a Serial connection, and the serial connection was then read using Pd-extended, which processed the distance information gathered by the sensors into DMX values, which were then sent to the eight lights in the room using Q Lighting Controller and a USB-DMX interface, as well as controlling the volume of a stereo sound piece. I developed this interactive system using Linux.

The effect of the interactive system and the shifting cloth sheets created an evolving, generative artwork which was directly (distance to nodes changing the colour of lights) as well as indirectly (air turbulence gradually changing the position of sheets) controlled by the visitors to the gallery. The eight lights in different colours shining at different angles on different cloth sheets produced a number of subtle colour changes throughout the room, with colours regularly being intersected and changed by the cloth sheets.

Visitors responded very well to the interactivity in the piece, keen to see how their movements would change the colours in the space and to experience the work through discovery and participation.

‘A Third Exhibit’ was shown for The Late Shows 2015
Photography by Corbin Wood and Helen Shaddock.

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Superdream, Connect ZA, Gateshead, Johannesburg and Jeppe Park

http://isitok.net/superdream/

Over the past few months I have been involved in the Superdream project, which has been coordinated by ISIS Arts, The Trinity Session, Sticky Situations, The Swallows Foundation, Gateshead Council and others to produce Art for public spaces in both Gateshead and Jeppestown, Johannesburg and to create links between UK and South African artists.

For the Superdream project I produced digital media art for two events, one in Windmill Hills Park, Gateshead and one in Jeppe Park, Johannesburg. Both areas were ‘undeveloped’, and one of the aims of the interventions in these spaces was to redefine public space through art, technology, innovation and a sense of community.

In Windmill Hills on May 2nd 2014 I presented an interactive audiovisual work, in stages of development.

‘Polyfields’ used four HC-SR04 ultrasonic distance sensors on an Arduino Mega 2560 programmed in Arduino’s IDE to output the distance of objects from the sensors, and these distances were used by Pd-extended to be the controls for a four channel audio piece, as well as a four channel video piece.

The audio and video data was taken from four sites around the park, both using conventional microphones as well as contact microphones and wall sensor modules, and video was also taken from these four sites – with one sensor representing one ‘site’.

In this way the participants (purposefully or accidentally) would introduce ‘channels’ of video and audio, to create their own experience of this supernormal locus of identity.

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I was then invited to go to Johannesburg with ISIS arts and The Trinity Session along with Lucy Carolan, Richard Glynn, Andrea Masala, Marek Gabrysch and Charlotte Gregory to produce work for the Superdream event in Jeppe Park as part of the British Council’s Connect ZA programme.

For this event I presented a redesigned version of my work for Windmill Hills, using material gathered from Jeppe Park, working on collaboration with South African artists Em Kay and KMSN, and re-coded the installation using Max/MSP/Jitter and the NewPing library. The four sensors were nailed to a tree in Jeppe Park and the participants were invited to interact with it as they pleased, again creating their own experience of the artwork, it lying dormant until interaction was detected.

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For this event I also created a piece based around a table football table sourced from a workshop next to the park which was close to a state of disrepair. With the help of Marek Gabrysch the table was able to be restored to it’s full working condition, and I augmented the football table with sensors in the goals, as well as small buffers next to the goals to wire the football table for sound, with a small selection panel on the side of the football table, players could select sounds which were triggered by hitting the buffers, and a random ‘Goal!’ sound would be triggered when a goal was scored.

This installation was created using an Arduino Mega 2560 and a Raspberry Pi running Stanford University’s Satellite CCRMA operating system. I designed a patch in Pd-extended interfacing with the Arduino using the Firmata software, which was then run from a headless Raspberry Pi which handled the sound. It was very much a prototype – a bespoke installation for the park.

The installation was very popular with the local children and thanks to some fantastic refereeing by one of the South African artists there were quite a few hotly contested games!

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Aether – ‘the upper pure, bright air’

This video serves as documentation of a composition I wrote with Dario Lozano-Thornton for sine waves and computer controlled strobe. Aether is a 9 minute audiovisual composition, with a score for an arduino-based variable rate and intensity strobe composed based on a composition for pure tones by Dario.

The piece is reflective of demanding physical data extracted from extremely simple conditions – pure frequencies and binary visual states. The audio frequencies due to their nature and spectral placement appear at certain points to be distorting, or coming from multiple sources, however this is not the case, it is simply our ears’ inability to accurately represent that data. Similarly with the strobe light, it is difficult for our eyes (and cameras) to accurately represent binary states past certain frequencies, so visual hallucination and distortion can occur. Unfortunately, this composition is difficult to accurately represent on camera due to extremely fast strobes.

The video is from a showing of Aether at Broadacre House, at the Function event. The composition was adapted for two flashing laptop screens for this event.